Microsoft PowerApps and Flow have been generally available since late 2016. They’re both tools that allow business users to streamline business processes without the use of code. Microsoft positioned PowerApps as their recommended replacement for InfoPath as the business user’s forms designer, and Flow as their replacement for SharePoint Workflow.

While these are welcomed replacements, both solutions also provide a broader level of support to the Microsoft stack and across a wide array of third-party applications.  I’ve recently been working with PowerApps and Flow to replace some internal applications, as well as to build proof-of-concepts for our existing clients. Here’s what I think of each, both separately and when putting them together… Read More…

For the last few years, I have enjoyed participating in HOUR OF CODE – a global movement reaching tens of millions of students in 180+ countries. In 2017, 154,012 Hour Of Code events were registered worldwide.

To show how much fun (and useful) coding is, I wanted the kids to build something real,  vs. simply making their favorite character walk left or right.  I decided to use the MIT App Inventor tool for my Hour of Code sessions. App Inventor is a browser-based tool that allows you to build your own apps.  We built a simple Android app to help parents reduce distractions while driving. Even though the app is super simple, the results are cool enough for kids to proudly show the app to their parents.

Here is a 10-minute video of the steps we followed to build and test the app: Read More…

2017 was another great year overall here at AIS, and also marked the fifth anniversary of our blog! We hope you enjoyed reading and found our posts helpful and interesting. We’re all pretty passionate about what we do here, and look forward to sharing more thoughts, insights and solutions in 2018 and beyond!

As we close out the year, here are the top 10 most read and shared blog posts of 2017:

1) Office 365 Groups vs. Microsoft Teams by Jason Storch

2) Lift & Shift: Migrating Legacy Applications to Azure Cloud by Nasir Mirza

3) Dockerization of Azure PaaS (Beyond Azure Container) by Vishwas Lele

4) Managed Images in Azure (Create & Deploy) by Justin Baca

5) Building Stateless Microservice Using Microsoft Service Fabric Series by Kasi Srinivasan

6) Azure PaaS Options: When to Use What? by Vishwas Lele

7) A three-way tie (!) for Parts One, Two & Three of Automated Deployments with Azure Resource Manager Templates, Azure Automation, & Octopus Deploy by Harun Davood

8) It’s Time to Review the Failure Modes of Your #cloud App(s) by Vishwas Lele

9) Pattern Matching vs. Deep Learning by Vishwas Lele

10) A Fix for the SharePoint Search Query/Result Mismatch by Clint Richardson

Happy New Year to all our readers and bloggers! Be sure to follow AIS on Twitter, Facebook or LinkedIn so you’ll never miss a post.

As 2017 ends, it’s clear that while the enterprises (public sector and commercial) are increasingly moving to the public cloud, they face significant challenges. Earlier in the year, I wrote about bridging the chasm between the expectations from an enterprise regarding cloud capabilities and the actual out-of-the box features offered by cloud providers. Additional challenges include the foundational culture shift to cloud governance, DevOps and automation, security and compliance, and mapping an enterprise’s application portfolio to a complex array of cloud service options.

Here are five things you can do next year to better assist enterprises adopt the public cloud: Read More…

Microsoft AppSource is a great destination for discovering line-of-business SaaS offerings, ISV apps and services offered by SIs. Today, we are proud to announce that the AIS Service Catalog (ASC) is now available in AppSource.

You can now get started with ASC in just minutes by clicking here – simply login to AppSource and then onboard your Azure subscription to ASC. You can leverage ASC as a SaaS or deploy a dedicated instance of ASC inside your subscription. Please feel free to contact us for more information.

We believe that Service Catalog is an important part of any Enterprise DevOps Toolchain. This is why, after years of guiding enterprises and government agencies through their journey to Enterprise Cloud DevOps, we built ASC as a Service Catalog for Azure.

In a nutshell, ASC allows developers to quickly provision enterprise-approved resources in Azure. ASC’s features and key benefits can be broken into two high-level areas: Read More…

Azure Redis Cache Geo-Replication gives you the ability to link two Redis caches across Azure regions, thus establishing a primary/secondary relationship across the regions. So is this capability best-suited for Disaster Recovery (DR), High Availability (HA) or both? Let’s investigate.  Read More…

Copyright: <a href='https://www.123rf.com/profile_viktorus'>viktorus / 123RF Stock Photo</a>

I thought Per Werngren made some important observations in his recent article for Redmond Channel Partner Magazine. His main point: System Integrators (SIs) need to evolve their business models or risk disintermediation. As workloads are migrated to AWS and Azure, automation replaces the need for people to perform those tasks. This automation enables governance and compliance to standards, while also setting the stage for better downstream, fully-automated management, monitoring and operations. This, of course, further reduces the need for people performing in those roles,

Meanwhile, the new generation of intelligent PaaS services for predictive analytics, artificial intelligence, machine learning, etc. are also replacing jobs once done by hand. These new tools allow us to build better and more intelligent applications.

Despite all this potential for automation, we still regularly see organizations allowing contractors to move workloads manually. It’s simply in a staffing contractor’s best interest to have people do this, despite it being a time-consuming and error-prone process. But why would an SI recommend automation and reduce their long-term revenue? Read More…

The Microsoft Azure team recently announced significant (up to 72%) discounts for customers willing to make one- to three-year reservations. Reserved Instances (RI) are not new, of course – Amazon Web Services (AWS) has had RI for a long time. But are there differences in how the Azure team rolled out RI?

For example: When does it really make sense to use an RI? Can RI discounts be combined with unique offers, like Azure Hybrid Benefit? Can customers cancel their reservation or exchange reserved VM types? What are some of best practices when making these decisions about one-year vs. three-year reservations?

We tried to answer many of these questions in the slide deck below, which we prepared for an internal briefing.

RI Essentials [PDF]

Hope this helps, and please let us know if you have any additional questions in the comments below!

While cloud is fast becoming the “new normal” for government, agencies are still challenged with the daunting task of IT modernization and developing a cohesive cloud migration strategy. Oftentimes, what’s holding back progress is that there simply isn’t a one-size-fits-all cloud playbook. That, combined with agency culture, hinders many agencies from making the move to cloud.

The November #AzureGov Meetup this week brought in both a packed house and a great lineup of government and industry experts who shared their best practices on critical components for cloud success, including: stakeholder engagement, evaluation, planning, implementation, outcomes…and the cultural changes you need to ensure a smooth transition.

We also celebrated the two year anniversary of the #AzureGov Meetup!


Read More…